Volume 8, Issue 4, July 2020, Page: 102-107
Prevalence of Oncogenic Human Papillomavirus Genotypes Among Sexually Active Women in Parakou (Benin, West Africa)
Christianne Gandekon, Faculty of Medicine, University of Parakou, Parakou, Republic of Benin
Rachidi Sidi Imorou, Faculty of Medicine, University of Parakou, Parakou, Republic of Benin
Théodora Zohoncon, Faculty of Health Sciences, University Saint Thomas d’Aquin, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso; LABIOGENE, CERBA, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
Moutawakilou Gomina, Faculty of Medicine, University of Parakou, Parakou, Republic of Benin
Alice Ouedraogo, LABIOGENE, CERBA, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso; UFR Life and Earth Sciences, University Ouaga I Professeur Joseph KI-ZERBO, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
Ina Traore, UFR Life and Earth Sciences, University Ouaga I Professeur Joseph KI-ZERBO, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
Essolokina Dolou, LABIOGENE, CERBA, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
Prosper Bado, LABIOGENE, CERBA, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso; UFR Life and Earth Sciences, University Ouaga I Professeur Joseph KI-ZERBO, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
Esther Traore, LABIOGENE, CERBA, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso; UFR Life and Earth Sciences, University Ouaga I Professeur Joseph KI-ZERBO, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
Charlemagne Ouedraogo, UFR Life and Earth Sciences, University Ouaga I Professeur Joseph KI-ZERBO, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
Jacques Simpore, Faculty of Health Sciences, University Saint Thomas d’Aquin, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso; LABIOGENE, CERBA, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso; UFR Life and Earth Sciences, University Ouaga I Professeur Joseph KI-ZERBO, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
Simon Akpona, Faculty of Medicine, University of Parakou, Parakou, Republic of Benin
Received: Jun. 25, 2020;       Accepted: Jul. 13, 2020;       Published: Jul. 28, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.jgo.20200804.16      View  154      Downloads  40
Abstract
Background: The genital infection due to Human papillomavirus (HPV) is considered as the most common sexually transmitted infection across the world, including high-risk oncogenic HPV (HR/HPV). Objective: This study aimed to determine the prevalence of HR/HPV genotypes among sexually active women in Parakou (Benin) in 2017. Methods: This research work was a cross-sectional descriptive study carried out in the city of Parakou (Benin), from January 15 to April 15, 2017. Sample consisted of 247 sexually active women selected through a systematic random sampling. Cervical specimens collected with swab were subject to multiplex PCR to characterize 14 HR/HPV genotypes. Results: The prevalence of HR/HPV infection was rated 32.8% [95% CI: 27.1-39.3]. All the fourteen HR/HPV genotypes investigated were detected using PCR among our study population. The most common types of HR/HPV were, in descending order, HPV45 (25.9%), HPV35 (18.5%), HPV52 (17.3%), HPV51 (16.0%) and HPV58 (14.8%). HPV16 and 18 were found out at respective proportions of 2.5% and 7.4%. Age group 20 years or less had the highest prevalence of HR/HPV infection (55.7%) followed by age group from 21 to 30 years (38.3%). Conclusion: The prevalence of HR/HPV infection is high among sexually active women in Parakou in 2017 and the most frequent HR/HPV are not those found commonly in precancerous and cancerous cervical lesions.
Keywords
High-Risk HPV, Prevalence, Real Time PCR, Women, Benin
To cite this article
Christianne Gandekon, Rachidi Sidi Imorou, Théodora Zohoncon, Moutawakilou Gomina, Alice Ouedraogo, Ina Traore, Essolokina Dolou, Prosper Bado, Esther Traore, Charlemagne Ouedraogo, Jacques Simpore, Simon Akpona, Prevalence of Oncogenic Human Papillomavirus Genotypes Among Sexually Active Women in Parakou (Benin, West Africa), Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Vol. 8, No. 4, 2020, pp. 102-107. doi: 10.11648/j.jgo.20200804.16
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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