Volume 7, Issue 5, September 2019, Page: 138-141
The Effect of Perinatal Maternal Health Knowledge Explaining Combined Full-time Nursing Staff Accompanying on Maternal Labor and Pregnancy
Liang Wenfei, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, the First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Guangzhou, China
Zuo Li, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, the First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Guangzhou, China
Gao Yujing, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, the First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Guangzhou, China
Huang Xinke, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, the First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Guangzhou, China
Received: Aug. 29, 2019;       Accepted: Sep. 16, 2019;       Published: Sep. 30, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.jgo.20190705.13      View  85      Downloads  10
Abstract
Objective: TO investigate the effect of perinatal maternal health knowledge explaining combined full-time nursing staff accompanying on maternal labor and pregnancy. Methods In our hospital from January 2016 to October 2018, 173 primiparas were randomly divided into control group (87 cases) and nursing group (86 cases). The control group was given perinatal routine care, the observation group was given perinatal maternal health knowledge explaining combined full-time nursing staff accompanying. The maternal psychological state, labor, pregnancy outcome and neonatal Apgar score were compared between the two groups. Results: Before the intervention, the scores of SAS (51.37±5.73) and SDS (63.32±6.17) in the nursing group were not significantly different from those in the control group (SAS 51.74±5.82 and SDS 63.47±6.21) (P>0.05). After the intervention, the SAS (37.51±3.51 points) and SDS (44.58±4.23 points) scores in the observation group were significantly lower than those control group (43.36±4.95 points, 52.46±4.51 points) (P<0.05). Besides, there was no significant difference between the nursing group (401.3±102.6 min) and the control group (404.2±104.5 min) in the first stage of labor (P > 0.05). However, the second (25.2±4.3min) and third (8.3±2.1min) labor time of nursing group was significantly less than those of the control group (46.8±6.7min, 11.4±2.6min) ((P < 0.05). And, the pregnancy outcomes of the nursing group were significantly better than the control group ((P < 0.05). Furthermore, the Apgar score in the nursing group (9.25±1.03) was significantly higher than that in the control group (8.24±1.35) ((P < 0.05). Conclusion: Perinatal maternal health knowledge and combined with full-time nursing staff can help reduce maternal anxiety and depression, shorten labor time, improve maternal pregnancy outcomes, and improve neonatal Apgar score, which is worthy of clinical application.
Keywords
Perinatal Maternal Health Knowledge, Full-time Nursing Staff Accompanying, Labor Process, Pregnancy Outcome
To cite this article
Liang Wenfei, Zuo Li, Gao Yujing, Huang Xinke, The Effect of Perinatal Maternal Health Knowledge Explaining Combined Full-time Nursing Staff Accompanying on Maternal Labor and Pregnancy, Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Vol. 7, No. 5, 2019, pp. 138-141. doi: 10.11648/j.jgo.20190705.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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