Volume 7, Issue 1, January 2019, Page: 25-30
Socio-biologic Predictors of Active Cytomegalovirus Infection Among Pregnant Women in a Low-resource Setting
Awoleke Jacob Olumuyiwa, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria
Omoyajowo Adefunke Christianah, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Bowen University, Osun State, Nigeria
Ajayi David Daisi, Department of Medical Laboratory Science, Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital, Ado – Ekiti, Nigeria
Awoleke Adeola Olabisi, School of Nursing, Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital, Ado – Ekiti, Nigeria
Received: Feb. 16, 2019;       Accepted: Mar. 22, 2019;       Published: Apr. 13, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.jgo.20190701.14      View  74      Downloads  14
Abstract
Active maternal cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is the bedrock of congenital CMV with its debilitating sequelae. Information on socio-biologic predictors of active maternal infection in southwest Nigeria is lacking. However, modifying locality-specific risk factors could reduce the burden of CMV. The aim of the study is to identify the socio-biologic determinants for active maternal CMV infection in a Nigerian setting. Using a cross-sectional design, ELISA kits were employed to quantify the anti-CMV IgG and IgM antibodies in the sera of consecutive antenatal attendees at the Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital (EKSUTH), Nigeria. Among the respondents, 23 (12.4%) were seropositive for both anti-CMV IgG and IgM antibodies. The regression analysis showed that the likelihood of being seropositive for both anti-CMV IgG and IgM antibodies was predicted by having a child less than 5 years old (adjusted OR: 5.53; 95% CI: 1.08 – 28.30; p = 0.04), while those who were skilled workers were least likely to be seropositive for both antibodies (adjusted OR: 0.06; 95% CI: 0.01 – 0.95; p = 0.04). Also, infection with cytomegalovirus was associated with pre-eclampsia (adjusted OR: 0.03; 95% CI: 0.002 – 0.41; p = 0.01). High prevalence of active maternal CMV infection was noted from the study, and this was associated with pre-eclampsia and caring for children under-5. Educating pregnant non-immune women about CMV and its prevention, coupled with the improvement in socio-economic status of the populace can reduce the burden in low-resource settings.
Keywords
Cytomegalovirus, Socio-biologic Predictors, Immunoglobulin M (IgM), Screening, Low-resource Setting
To cite this article
Awoleke Jacob Olumuyiwa, Omoyajowo Adefunke Christianah, Ajayi David Daisi, Awoleke Adeola Olabisi, Socio-biologic Predictors of Active Cytomegalovirus Infection Among Pregnant Women in a Low-resource Setting, Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Vol. 7, No. 1, 2019, pp. 25-30. doi: 10.11648/j.jgo.20190701.14
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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