Volume 6, Issue 3, May 2018, Page: 47-55
Magnitude and Associated Factors of Protein Energy Malnutrition among Children Aged 6-59 Months in Wondogenet District, Sidama Zone, Southern Ethiopia
Kaleb Mayisso Rodamo, Faculty of Health Sciences, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Hawassa University, Hawassa, Ethiopia
Yonas Alemayehu Fiche, Faculty of Health Sciences, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Hawassa University, Hawassa, Ethiopia
Fisseha Bonja Geleto, Faculty of Health Sciences, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Hawassa University, Hawassa, Ethiopia
Rekiku Fikre Abebe, Faculty of Health Sciences, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Hawassa University, Hawassa, Ethiopia
Desalegn Dabaro Dangiso, Department of Social and Population Health, Yirgalem Hospital Medical College, Yirgalem, Ethiopia
Received: Feb. 9, 2018;       Accepted: Mar. 13, 2018;       Published: Jun. 14, 2018
DOI: 10.11648/j.jgo.20180603.13      View  1569      Downloads  218
Abstract
Background: Failure to provide sufficient nutrients during rapid rates of growth results in malnutrition, which is complex in its etiology and increasing in its manifestations. Ethiopia is one of the developing countries where malnutrition and communicable diseases represent the major health problems, and children are the more vulnerable group than others. Objectives: To assess magnitude of protein energy malnutrition and associated factors among children aged 6-59 months in Wondogenet district, southern Ethiopia. Methods: A community based cross-sectional study was employed on 422 mother-child pairs of 6-59 months old children in April 2017 using both quantitative and qualitative methods. A pretested semi-structured questionnaire and anthropometric measurement were used to collect data. Logistic regression was fitted to identify associated factors, and Focused Group Discussion was used to substantiate the quantitative finding. Result: The analysis of this study revealed that, 45.5%, 38.7% and 15.7% of children were stunted, underweight and severely wasted respectively. The major predictors of stunting were weight at birth and food distributions in the households. Age of the children was independently associated with wasting and underweight. Conclusion: The prevalence of malnutrition among children aged 6-59 months in the study area was very high. A child less than 2 years of age, a weight<2.5 kg at birth and deprived special attention during feeding children in the households were associated with increased odds of being malnourished. Thus, it is recommended that the parents and care givers should strive to improve the awareness on timely introduction of supplementary food with optimum nutritional value for children less than 2 years of age, and to pay special attention for children on meal time. Birth attendants should pay due attention on proper identification for birth weight and early diagnosis and on time management of neonatal illnesses related with low birth weight.
Keywords
Protein Energy Malnutrition, Stunting, Underweight, Wasting, Children Aged 5-59 Months
To cite this article
Kaleb Mayisso Rodamo, Yonas Alemayehu Fiche, Fisseha Bonja Geleto, Rekiku Fikre Abebe, Desalegn Dabaro Dangiso, Magnitude and Associated Factors of Protein Energy Malnutrition among Children Aged 6-59 Months in Wondogenet District, Sidama Zone, Southern Ethiopia, Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Vol. 6, No. 3, 2018, pp. 47-55. doi: 10.11648/j.jgo.20180603.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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