Volume 3, Issue 4, July 2015, Page: 77-82
Amniotic Fluid Embolism During Emergent Cesarean Section at 25 Weeks of Gestation: A Case Report
Khalid Guelzim, Department of Gynecology-Obstetric - Military Training Hospital Med V, Rabat, Morocco
Youssef Benabdejlil, Department of Gynecology-Obstetric - Military Training Hospital Med V, Rabat, Morocco
Adil Chennana, Department of Gynecology-Obstetric - Military Training Hospital Med V, Rabat, Morocco
Mohammed Moutaouakil, Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, Military Training Hospital Med V, Rabat, Morocco
Adil Boudhas, Department of Pathological Anatomy, Military Training Hospital Med V, Rabat, Morocco
Jaouad Kouach, Department of Gynecology-Obstetric - Military Training Hospital Med V, Rabat, Morocco
Mohammed Oukabli, Department of Pathological Anatomy, Military Training Hospital Med V, Rabat, Morocco
Chafiq Haimeur, Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, Military Training Hospital Med V, Rabat, Morocco
Driss Moussaoui, Department of Gynecology-Obstetric - Military Training Hospital Med V, Rabat, Morocco
Mohammed Dehayni, Department of Gynecology-Obstetric - Military Training Hospital Med V, Rabat, Morocco
Received: May 31, 2015;       Accepted: Jun. 12, 2015;       Published: Jun. 30, 2015
DOI: 10.11648/j.jgo.20150304.12      View  4570      Downloads  117
Abstract
Amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) is a rare but fatal obstetric emergency, characterized by sudden cardiovascular collapse, dyspnea or respiratory arrest and altered mentality, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). It can lead to severe maternal morbidity and mortality, but the prediction of its occurrence and treatment are very difficult. We report a case of AFE during emergent Cesarean section at 25 weeks of gestation for high vaginal bleeding, caused by placenta praevia totally recovered, in a 36 years old woman having a history of two c-section and carring bichorial biamniotic twin pregnancy. Sudden dyspnea, hypotension, signs of pulmonary edema and DIC were developed during Cesarean section, and cardiac arrest followed after these events. The course of these events was so rapid and catastrophic, which was consistent with AFE and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC).Thus, we report this case precisely and review pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment of AFE by referring to up-to-date literatures.
Keywords
Complications, Amniotic Fluid Embolism, Cardiac Arrest, Surgery, Cesarean Section
To cite this article
Khalid Guelzim, Youssef Benabdejlil, Adil Chennana, Mohammed Moutaouakil, Adil Boudhas, Jaouad Kouach, Mohammed Oukabli, Chafiq Haimeur, Driss Moussaoui, Mohammed Dehayni, Amniotic Fluid Embolism During Emergent Cesarean Section at 25 Weeks of Gestation: A Case Report, Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Vol. 3, No. 4, 2015, pp. 77-82. doi: 10.11648/j.jgo.20150304.12
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