Volume 2, Issue 4, July 2014, Page: 49-53
Lack of Association between ACE I/D and AGTR1 A1166C Gene Polymorphisms and Preeclampsia in Turkish Pregnant Women of Trakya Region
Nevra Alkanli, Department of Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine, Trakya University, Edirne, Turkey
Tammam Sipahi, Department of Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine, Trakya University, Edirne, Turkey
Tulay Okman Kilic, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Trakya University, Edirne, Turkey
Seralp Sener, Department of Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine, Trakya University, Edirne, Turkey
Received: May 19, 2014;       Accepted: Jun. 10, 2014;       Published: Jun. 30, 2014
DOI: 10.11648/j.jgo.20140204.11      View  3385      Downloads  243
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the distribution of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Insertion/Deletion (ACE I/D) and the distribution of Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor A1166C (AGTR1 A1166C) gene polymorphisms in preeclamptic pregnant women comparing to control pregnant women in Turkish subjects of Trakya Region. We aimed to determine whether these polymorphisms are genetic risk factor for preeclampsia. The study included 75 preeclamptic pregnant women and 75 control pregnant women, which were categorized according to The World Health Organization Detecting Pre-eclampsia: A Practical Guide. The ACE I/D gene polymorphism was investigated using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) method. The AGTR1 A1166C gene polymorphism was identified using PCR and followed by Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) methods. The ACE I/D genotype distribution in preeclamptic pregnant women DD=36.0%, ID=44.0% and II=20.0% did not significantly differ from those in control pregnant women DD=38.7%, ID=50.7% and II=10.6% (P=0.279). The AGTR1 A1166C genotype distribution in preeclamptic pregnant women AA=57.3%, AC=33.4% and CC=9.3% also did not significantly differ from those in control pregnant women AA=70.7, AC=24.0% and CC=5.3% (P=0.223). This case-control study show that ACE I/D and AGTR1 A1166C gene polymorphisms are not genetic risk factors for preeclampsia in this population in Turkish pregnant women of Trakya Region.
Keywords
Preeclampsia, ACE I/D Gene Polymorphism, AGTR1 A1166C Gene Polymorphism, PCR, RFLP
To cite this article
Nevra Alkanli, Tammam Sipahi, Tulay Okman Kilic, Seralp Sener, Lack of Association between ACE I/D and AGTR1 A1166C Gene Polymorphisms and Preeclampsia in Turkish Pregnant Women of Trakya Region, Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Vol. 2, No. 4, 2014, pp. 49-53. doi: 10.11648/j.jgo.20140204.11
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